runningforsurvival:  Miss you lots!! :( <3

I miss ya too, babydoll! When are ya comin to see me again?!


troystunes:

jessy carolina & the hot mess darktown strutters’ ball

hominisaevum:

Unexpected Renaissance Sense of Humor

Anonymous Flemish artist, Satirical Diptych, early 16th century, oil on panel. Université de Liège 

Pannels read:

  1. Leave this panel closed, otherwise you’ll be angry with me.
  2. It’s not my fault because I warned you in advance!
  3. The more we want to warn you, the more you’ll want to jump out the window.

Giving a precise meaning is not easy. This type of art is extremely rare in the sixteenth century. You can find similar correspondents in some paintings by Hieronymus Bosch and Quentin Massys, but they are only minor elements and not the main topic. 

blackhistoryalbum:

ICE CREAM FAIRY | 1922Unidentified African American girl eating Ice cream in the Winter, 1922
Black History Album, The Way We WereFollow us on WEB  TUMBLR  PINTEREST  FACEBOOK  TWITTER.

blackhistoryalbum:

ICE CREAM FAIRY | 1922
Unidentified African American girl eating Ice cream in the Winter, 1922

Black History Album, The Way We Were
Follow us on WEB  TUMBLR  PINTEREST  FACEBOOK  TWITTER.

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

What if one of the most important street photographers of the 20th century was a 1950s children’s nanny who kept herself to herself and never showed a single one of her photographs to anyone?

Decades later in 2007, a Chicago real estate agent and historical hobbyist, John Maloof purchased a box of never-seen, never-developed film negatives of an unknown ‘amateur’ photographer for $380 at his local auction house.

 

John began developing his new collection of photographs, some 100,000 negatives in total, that had been abandoned in a storage locker in Chicago before they ended up at the auction house. It became clear these were no ordinary street snaps of 1950s & 60s Chicago and New York and so John embarked on a journey to find out who was behind the photographs and soon discovered her name: Vivien Maier.

 

More here